Night Sweats – Menopause Relief, Hot Flashes, Black Cohosh – Menopause Symptoms Relief

April 23rd, 2014

I'm a woman in my 50's and have been having hot flashes, night sweats and just general menopausal blahs for a few years now. To complicate matters my doctor does not believe in treatments for menopausal symptoms. With kind of an old school attitude, my doctor adopts the "tough it out you'll get through it" philosophy. Although I love and respect my doctor, these symptoms are interrupting my whole life. So I decided I just had to do something. I proceeded to wear out Google trying to find the right product. Then I wore out every website I could think of trying to find where to buy the right product.

After much research I decided to buy Night Sweats Menopause Relief Formula on Amazon.com. At first I noticed a reduction in the severity of my night sweats and after a few weeks my symptoms were more or less gone.

Purchasing on Amazon.com means a 30 day satisfaction guarantee. But the customer service from the manufacturer is frankly amazing. I was notified via email that my order had shipped, another email to confirm that my order arrived, then after 30 days, a final email to make sure I was satisfied: impressive, unbelievable customer service.

My outlook on life has dramatically changed for the better. I think I can get throughout this. If you suffer from menopause related symptoms, don't. Try this. You really have nothing to lose.

DON'T SUFFER THROUGH NIGHT SWEATS AND HOT FLASHES – FIGHT BACK!

Night Sweats Relief(TM) is Your Army in the Battle Against Menopause
- Halts Night Sweats
- Calms Hot Flashes
- Eliminates Many Other Frustrating Symptoms
- Ease Perimenopause Onset
- Balanced Formula is Easy on the Stomach

An All New Formula
By naturally balancing the body's hormone levels, Night Sweats Relief(TM) relieves night sweats,hot flashes, and other menopause-related symptoms. If left unchecked, night sweats and hot flashes affect a woman's sleep cycle which, in turn affect mental attitude, energy and concentration levels.

- Don't Suffer Needlessly
- Feel Like Yourself Again
- Feel Better

THE ONLY THING YOU HAVE TO LOSE IS SLEEP

Check this out at amazon.com/Night-Sweats-Perimenopause-Menopause-Effective/dp/B00E3H1ER4/night sweats relief/

No association found between low vitamin D and menopause symptoms

April 22nd, 2014

A new study from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) shows no significant connection between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms. The study was published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society.

The authors analyzed the relationship between the blood levels of vitamin D and a number of menopause symptoms, including hot flashes, night sweats, sleep disturbance, concentration, and forgetfulness in 530 women who participated in the calcium and vitamin D WHI trial.

There was good reason to look for a link because other studies have implied some relationship. For example, breast cancer patients with higher vitamin D levels have fewer hot flashes and other symptoms than women with lower levels. Supplementing vitamin D can improve mood in other groups of people. The vitamin can protect against depletion of serotonin, which plays a role in regulating body heat. And vitamin D deficiency can result in muscle and joint pain.

Furthermore, estrogen plays a role in activating vitamin D, meaning that the estrogen deficiency that comes with menopause could worsen any problems with vitamin D deficiency.

The number of symptoms and vitamin D levels had a borderline significant relationship at first, but after the analysts adjusted for multiple comparisons, the association disappeared. And in looking at multiple comparisons, no individual menopause symptoms were significantly associated with vitamin D either.

“With so many women taking vitamin D supplements these days, it is good to know what it can and cannot do. We need to be realistic in our expectations,” says NAMS Executive Director Margery Gass, MD.

The authors cautioned that this study doesn’t entirely prove that vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms are not connected because the sample of women they had with enough data was relatively small and the women, who averaged age 66, were nearly 16 years from menopause, and only 27 percent of the women in this group had hot flashes or night sweats. Looking at vitamin D levels in women as they go through the menopause transition might be valuable.

Night Sweats – Menopause Relief, Hot Flashes, Black Cohosh – Menopause Symptoms Relief

April 22nd, 2014

I'm a woman in my 50's and have been having hot flashes, night sweats and just general menopausal blahs for a few years now. And to make matters worse my doctor does not believe in medicating menopausal symptoms. With kind of an old school attitude, my doctor adopts the "tough it out you'll get through it" philosophy. Now, I love my doctor and I do agree with him most of the time. But these symptoms, they are affecting my whole life. So I decided I just had to do something. I wore Google out searching for the right product then looked at numerous websites in my quest to find the best place to make my purchase.

After much research I decided to buy Night Sweats Menopause Relief Formula on Amazon.com. At first I noticed a reduction in the severity of my night sweats and after a few weeks they were nearly gone.

Buying on Amazon.com, my purchase of Night Sweats Menopause Relief Formula was protected with a 30 day, money back guarantee. But the customer service from the manufacturer is frankly amazing. I was notified via email that my order had shipped, another email to confirm that my order arrived, then after 30 days, a final email to make sure I was satisfied: impressive, unbelievable customer service.

I now have a very different, much better, outlook. I think I can get throughout this. If you suffer from menopause related symptoms, don't. Try this. You really have nothing to lose.

SUFFERING NIGHT SWEATS AND HOT FLASHES? – FIGHT BACK!

Night Sweats Relief(TM) is Your Army in the Battle Against Menopause
- Halts Night Sweats
- Calms Hot Flashes
- Eliminates Numerous Other Menopause Symptoms
- Pre-empt Perimenopause Onset
- Balanced Formula is Easy on the Stomach

An All New Formula
Night Sweats Relief(TM) relieves night sweats and hot flashes by naturally balancing the body's hormone levels.. If left unchecked, night sweats and hot flashes affect a woman's sleep cycle which, in turn affect mental attitude, energy and concentration levels.

- Don't Suffer Needlessly
- Feel Like Yourself Again
- Feel Better

TRY IT NOW –

Keep reading about this night sweats relief product

Improved quality of life and lower societal costs achievable with new care pathway for incontinence

April 22nd, 2014

A major new study which reveals that healthcare providers could improve patient dignity and save millions if they adopt the right approach to continence care will be launched at the 5th Global Forum on Incontinence, being held on the theme of “Better care, better health – towards a framework for better continence solutions”.

The report, Optimum Continence Service Specification, which involved multi-disciplinary experts from around the globe in collaboration with KPMG, outlines a number of evidence-based principles on how to best organise community care for people with incontinence, while at the same time saving costs for health and social care systems.

“Incontinence is an under-reported and under-treated problem that imposes a considerable burden on the quality of life of patients and their caregivers” stated Adrian Wagg, Professor of Healthy Aging at the Department of Medicine of the University of Alberta (Canada) and the report’s lead author.

“Even if international and national clinical guidelines exist for incontinence, to date little effort has been put into studying how best to deliver the care for people with incontinence in the community. This is a serious limitation as most health and social care systems are under severe financial pressure and may not be able to afford the time or resources necessary to design a service specification for continence care delivery”, he said.

The Service Specification recommends an integrated approach to continence care and defines a specific modular system designed to guide the patient through all the necessary phases from detection of the symptoms through to appropriate assessment and treatment.

Underlying principles include improving the process for detection and treatment; shifting the responsibility of basic continence care to continence nurse specialists in primary care, using a case co-ordinator to ensure collaborative working, connecting specialists with other parts of the care pathway; establishing accredited programmes of training for nurses and other health or social care professionals; establishing comprehensive and standardised assessment processes to meet the needs of patients and caregivers with regards to containment products; and making the use of technology integral to the delivery of continence care.

A health economic study done by the Erasmus University in The Netherlands to identify the economic impact of the implementation of the Optimal Continence Service Specification was also unveiled today. The study shows that an improved care pathway based on the principles from the Optimum Continence Service Specification, if applied to patients over 65 years of age with four co-morbidities in The Netherlands, could save the Dutch healthcare system €14 million over a three years period and save €106 million over the same time span, from a societal perspective.

Conference co-moderator, Ian Milsom, Professor of Obstetrics and Gyneacology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg commented: “Both studies presented today at the 5th Global Forum on Incontinence will contribute to finding a way forward to tackling the demographic challenge. By helping delivering better services, these principles will ease the pressure on health systems, support active and healthy ageing and ultimately improve the quality of life of millions of citizens around the world”.

The summary of the Optimum Continence Service Specification Study is available on www.gfiforum.com.

No association found between low vitamin D and menopause symptoms

April 21st, 2014

A new study from the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) shows no significant connection between vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms. The study was published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society.

The authors analyzed the relationship between the blood levels of vitamin D and a number of menopause symptoms, including hot flashes, night sweats, sleep disturbance, concentration, and forgetfulness in 530 women who participated in the calcium and vitamin D WHI trial.

There was good reason to look for a link because other studies have implied some relationship. For example, breast cancer patients with higher vitamin D levels have fewer hot flashes and other symptoms than women with lower levels. Supplementing vitamin D can improve mood in other groups of people. The vitamin can protect against depletion of serotonin, which plays a role in regulating body heat. And vitamin D deficiency can result in muscle and joint pain.

Furthermore, estrogen plays a role in activating vitamin D, meaning that the estrogen deficiency that comes with menopause could worsen any problems with vitamin D deficiency.

The number of symptoms and vitamin D levels had a borderline significant relationship at first, but after the analysts adjusted for multiple comparisons, the association disappeared. And in looking at multiple comparisons, no individual menopause symptoms were significantly associated with vitamin D either.

“With so many women taking vitamin D supplements these days, it is good to know what it can and cannot do. We need to be realistic in our expectations,” says NAMS Executive Director Margery Gass, MD.

The authors cautioned that this study doesn’t entirely prove that vitamin D levels and menopause symptoms are not connected because the sample of women they had with enough data was relatively small and the women, who averaged age 66, were nearly 16 years from menopause, and only 27 percent of the women in this group had hot flashes or night sweats. Looking at vitamin D levels in women as they go through the menopause transition might be valuable.

Predicting Your Menopause Age: What Factors Matter

April 21st, 2014

When Will You Reach Menopause?

It’s a question many women wonder about, especially if you’re thinking about planning a family and your 20s are but a distant memory.

How many more years of fertility might you have, and how much longer will it be before you start experiencing “the change?”

Finding Help for Menopause

If you’re dealing with night sweats, hot flashes, and mood swings, you need
comfort and advice for surviving those menopausal years. Find it on this
message board from women who know just what you’re going through.

Living Through Menopause: A Menopause Support Group

 

Read the Finding Help for Menopause article

Here’s what does — and does not influence the age at when a woman reaches menopause.

The Top Factor

There are a number of factors that affect a woman’s age at menopause, but one is more important than any other: the age her mother experienced menopause.

“Menopause is strongly genetically linked, so you’re very likely to fall within a few years either way of the age your mother was at menopause,” says Nanette Santoro, MD, director of the division of reproductive endocrinology and infertility at the University of Colorado-Denver School of Medicine and a member of the board of directors of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

This isn’t always true, of course. Some women reach menopause at an unusually early age — before 45 or so — with no known cause, which could be the result of an inherited issue or a one-time genetic mutation. “These can be random events, but can also be passed on,” says Howard Zacur, MD, PhD, who directs the reproductive endocrinology and infertility division at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

So if your mother reached menopause at 40, but her sisters and your grandmother were all around the average age of 50, it’s unclear whether you’ll follow her path or theirs.

But if most of the women in your family, your mother included, reach menopause early, late, or somewhere in the middle, you can eye your calendar with some degree of confidence.

Menopause Age: 4 More Influences

Your mother’s age at menopause is a key factor, but not the only one. Here are four others to consider:


  1. Smoking

    . No other lifestyle factor does more damage to your ovaries than smoking. So if you smoke and your mother didn’t, you’ll probably reach menopause earlier than she did. If she smoked and you don’t, you probably reach menopause later than she did.

  2. Chemotherapy

    . Most forms of chemotherapy used in younger women are at least mildly toxic to the ovaries. Many women go through temporary menopause while undergoing chemotherapy; if cycles do return (they don’t always), you can still expect to reach regular menopause a couple of years earlier than you otherwise would have.
  3. Ovarian surgery. “The more you operate on the ovaries, the more healthy tissue gets damaged,” says Marcelle Cedars, MD, director of the division of reproductive endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine. So if you’ve had diagnostic surgery for endometriosis, for example, Cedars recommends using medical options (such as hormonal suppression) to treat the condition in order to avoid repetitive surgeries.
  4. Ethnicity. “Certain ethnic groups may have menopause at slightly different ages,” says Santoro. “Hispanic and African-American women reach menopause a little earlier, and Chinese and Japanese women a little later, than the average Caucasian woman, who reaches menopause at about age 51.5.” Those are averages; every woman is different.

 

Related Blogs

  • Related Blogs on Predicting Your Menopause Age: What Factors Matter

Originally posted 2012-06-20 05:27:25. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Source: http://www.webmd.com/menopause/features/menopause-age-prediction?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Night Sweats – Menopause Relief, Hot Flashes, Black Cohosh – Menopause Symptoms Relief

April 21st, 2014

As a 50 year old woman, I have been experiencing hot flashes, night sweats and just general menopausal blahs for a few years now. And to make matters worse my doctor does not believe in medicating menopausal symptoms. He says women have been going through it since the beginning of time, they lived through it, and I will too. Now, I love my doctor and I do agree with him most of the time. But these symptoms, they are affecting my whole life. So I decided to take matters into my own hands. I wore Google out searching for the right product then looked at numerous websites in my quest to find the best place to make my purchase.

After much research I decided to buy Night Sweats Menopause Relief Formula on Amazon.com. At first I noticed a reduction in the severity of my night sweats and after a few weeks they were nearly gone.

Buying on Amazon.com, my purchase of Night Sweats Menopause Relief Formula was protected with a 30 day, money back guarantee. But the customer service from the manufacturer is frankly amazing. I was notified via email that my order had shipped, another email to confirm that my order arrived, then after 30 days, a final email to make sure I was satisfied: impressive, unbelievable customer service.

My outlook on life has dramatically changed for the better. I think I can get throughout this. If you suffer from menopause related symptoms, don't. Try Night Sweats Menopause Relief Formula. You really have nothing to lose.

DON'T SUFFER THROUGH NIGHT SWEATS AND HOT FLASHES – FIGHT BACK!

Night Sweats Relief(TM) is Your Army in the Battle Against Menopause
- Halts Night Sweats
- Calms Hot Flashes
- Eliminates Numerous Other Frustrating Symptoms
- Ease Perimenopause Onset
- Balanced Formula is Easy on the Stomach

An All New Formula
Night Sweats Relief(TM) relieves night sweats and hot flashes by naturally balancing the body's hormone levels.. If left unchecked, night sweats and hot flashes affect a woman's sleep cycle which, in turn affect mental attitude, energy and concentration levels.

- Don't Suffer Needlessly
- Feel Like Yourself Again
- Sleep Better

THE ONLY THING YOU HAVE TO LOSE IS SLEEP

Check out this night sweats relief product now

Night Sweats – Menopause Relief, Hot Flashes, Black Cohosh – Menopause Symptoms Relief

April 20th, 2014

I'm a woman in my 50's and have been having hot flashes, night sweats and just general menopausal blahs for a few years now. To complicate matters my doctor does not believe in medicating menopausal symptoms. With kind of an old school attitude, my doctor adopts the "tough it out you'll get through it" philosophy. Although I love and respect my doctor, these symptoms are interrupting my whole life. So I decided I just had to do something. I proceeded to wear out Google trying to find the right product. Then I wore out every website I could think of trying to find where to buy the right product.

After much research I decided to buy Night Sweats Menopause Relief Formula on Amazon.com. When I first started taking the pills I noticed my hot flashes and night sweats were less than normal and after a few weeks they were nearly gone.

Buying on Amazon.com, my purchase of Night Sweats Menopause Relief Formula was protected with a 30 day, money back guarantee. But the customer service from the manufacturer frankly caught me by surprise. They emailed me before shipping, after delivery, and 30 days later just to make sure I was satisfied: impressive, unbelievable customer service.

My outlook on life has dramatically changed for the better. I do believe I can live through menopause. Don't suffer needlessly with night sweats, hot flashes, and other menopause symptoms. Try this. You really have nothing to lose.

SUFFERING NIGHT SWEATS AND HOT FLASHES? – FIGHT BACK!

Night Sweats Relief(TM) is Your Army in the Battle Against Menopause
- Halts Night Sweats
- Calms Hot Flashes
- Eliminates Numerous Other Menopause Symptoms
- Ease Perimenopause Onset
- Easy on the Stomach

An All New Formula
Night Sweats Relief(TM) relieves night sweats and hot flashes by naturally balancing the body's hormone levels.. If left unchecked, menopause symptoms affect a woman's sleep cycle which, in turn affect mental attitude, energy and concentration levels.

- Don't Suffer Needlessly
- Get Back to Sleep
- Feel Better

TRY IT NOW –

More about this night sweats relief product

Improved quality of life and lower societal costs achievable with new care pathway for incontinence

April 20th, 2014

A major new study which reveals that healthcare providers could improve patient dignity and save millions if they adopt the right approach to continence care will be launched at the 5th Global Forum on Incontinence, being held on the theme of “Better care, better health – towards a framework for better continence solutions”.

The report, Optimum Continence Service Specification, which involved multi-disciplinary experts from around the globe in collaboration with KPMG, outlines a number of evidence-based principles on how to best organise community care for people with incontinence, while at the same time saving costs for health and social care systems.

“Incontinence is an under-reported and under-treated problem that imposes a considerable burden on the quality of life of patients and their caregivers” stated Adrian Wagg, Professor of Healthy Aging at the Department of Medicine of the University of Alberta (Canada) and the report’s lead author.

“Even if international and national clinical guidelines exist for incontinence, to date little effort has been put into studying how best to deliver the care for people with incontinence in the community. This is a serious limitation as most health and social care systems are under severe financial pressure and may not be able to afford the time or resources necessary to design a service specification for continence care delivery”, he said.

The Service Specification recommends an integrated approach to continence care and defines a specific modular system designed to guide the patient through all the necessary phases from detection of the symptoms through to appropriate assessment and treatment.

Underlying principles include improving the process for detection and treatment; shifting the responsibility of basic continence care to continence nurse specialists in primary care, using a case co-ordinator to ensure collaborative working, connecting specialists with other parts of the care pathway; establishing accredited programmes of training for nurses and other health or social care professionals; establishing comprehensive and standardised assessment processes to meet the needs of patients and caregivers with regards to containment products; and making the use of technology integral to the delivery of continence care.

A health economic study done by the Erasmus University in The Netherlands to identify the economic impact of the implementation of the Optimal Continence Service Specification was also unveiled today. The study shows that an improved care pathway based on the principles from the Optimum Continence Service Specification, if applied to patients over 65 years of age with four co-morbidities in The Netherlands, could save the Dutch healthcare system €14 million over a three years period and save €106 million over the same time span, from a societal perspective.

Conference co-moderator, Ian Milsom, Professor of Obstetrics and Gyneacology, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg commented: “Both studies presented today at the 5th Global Forum on Incontinence will contribute to finding a way forward to tackling the demographic challenge. By helping delivering better services, these principles will ease the pressure on health systems, support active and healthy ageing and ultimately improve the quality of life of millions of citizens around the world”.

The summary of the Optimum Continence Service Specification Study is available on www.gfiforum.com.

During menopause prolonged and heavy bleeding is common

April 19th, 2014

Women going through menopause most likely think of it as the time for an end to predictable monthly periods. Researchers at the University of Michigan say it’s normal, however, for the majority of them to experience an increase in the amount and duration of bleeding episodes, which may occur at various times throughout the menopausal transition.

The researchers from the U-M School of Public Health and U-M Health System offer the first long-term study of bleeding patterns in women of multiple race/ethnicities who were going through menopause. They say the results could impact patient care and alleviate undue concern about what to expect during this life stage that can last anywhere from 2-to-10 years.

“For most women in their 30s, menstrual periods are highly predictable. With the onset of the menopausal transition in their 40s, women’s menstrual periods can change dramatically. These dramatic changes can be disconcerting and often provoke questions about whether something is wrong,” said Sioban Harlow, U-M professor of epidemiology.

“Women need more descriptive information about the bleeding changes they can expect. We need clear guidance to help women understand what changes in bleeding patterns do and do not require medical attention.”

The study, “Menstruation and the Menopausal Transition,” is reported in the current issue of BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

Specifically, the research found that it is not uncommon for women to have prolonged bleeding of 10 or more days, spotting for six or more days and/or heavy bleeding for three or more days during the transition. In fact, of the more than 1,300 women ages 42-52 in the study, 91 percent recorded 1-3 occurrences in a three-year period of bleeding that lasted 10 or more days, nearly 88 percent reported six or more days of spotting, and close to 78 percent recorded three or more days of heavy flow. More than a quarter of the women had as many as three episodes of the 10+ days of bleeding in a six-month period.

The data from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation involved participants recording their experiences over a period from 1996 to 2006. The women were identified as African-American, Japanese, Chinese and white, and were from southeast Michigan, Los Angeles and northern California. Previous studies have been short and mostly limited to white women.

A few differences were noted between race/ethnicities, but most women from all groups reported instances of bleeding following one or more of the three patterns. Other health factors impacted the experience as well, including reported uterine fibroids, use of hormones and body mass index.

The authors say more research is needed before determining if the information about what is normal in the menopausal transition should impact diagnostic or therapeutic interventions.

“We think this paper will be helpful to professionals, both clinical and investigational, as it describes in much more quantitative terms the range of bleeding patterns women may normally experience through the menopausal transition,” said Dr. John Randolph Jr., U-M professor of obstetrics and gynecology.

“This finding calls for further clinical research to determine the optimal diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for evaluating alterations in bleeding during the midlife. It forms the basis from which appropriate clinical trials can be designed, and may be reassuring to some clinicians at the initial presentation of any of these patterns that watchful waiting is an acceptable option.”