Correlation found between weight loss and hot flash reduction in menopause

July 24th, 2014

Now women have yet one more incentive to lose weight as a new study has shown evidence that behavioral weight loss can help manage menopausal hot flashes.

The pilot study, which was published online last month in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), consisted of 40 overweight or obese white and African-American women with hot flashes, which are the most prevalent symptom of menopause. In fact, more than 70% of women report hot flashes during the menopausal transition, with many of these women reporting frequent or severe hot flashes. Since women with hot flashes are at greater risk for poor quality of life, sleep problems and a depressed mood, interest in identifying methods for managing hot flashes is growing. In addition, newer data indicate that hot flashes are typically persistent, lasting an average of nine years or more.

For purposes of the pilot clinical trial, hot flashes were assessed before and after intervention via physiologic monitoring, diary and questionnaire. The study confirmed a significant correlation between weight loss and hot flashes. Furthermore, the degree of weight loss correlated with the degree of reduction in hot flashes.

Although newer data has suggested a positive relationship between hot flashes and the percentage of fat in a woman’s body, no studies, to date, had been specifically designed to test whether weight loss reduces hot flashes. The authors of this pilot study concluded that, while the results were encouraging in proving the benefits of weight reduction in the management of menopausal hot flashes, more than anything, the findings indicate the importance of conducting a larger study.

“This is encouraging news for women looking for relief for this bothersome midlife symptom,” says NAMS Executive Director Margery Gass, MD. “Not only might behavior weight loss provide a safe, effective remedy for many women, but it also encourages a health-promoting behavior. Since many of the women in this pilot study indicated their primary motivator for losing weight was hot flash reduction, we know that this could be a strong incentive for women to engage in a healthier lifestyle which provides numerous other health benefits beyond hot flash management.”

Bacterial communities may play a role in female urgency urinary incontinence

July 23rd, 2014

Bacteria found in the bladders of healthy women differ from bacteria in women with a common form of incontinence, according to researchers from Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

These findings, published in the American Society for Microbiology’s online journal mBio, suggest that bacterial communities may play a role in female urinary health.

“Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) is a common, yet poorly understood, condition with symptoms similar to urinary tract infections,” said Alan Wolfe, PhD, co-investigator and professor of Microbiology and Immunology. “If we can determine that certain bacteria cause UUI symptoms, we may be able to better identify those at risk for this condition and more effectively treat them.”

Approximately 15 percent of women suffer from UUI and yet an estimated 40 – 50 percent do not respond to conventional treatments. One possible explanation for the lack of response to medication may be the bacteria present in these women.

This study evaluated urine specimens of 90 women with and without UUI symptoms. Samples were collected through a catheter and analyzed using an expanded quantitative urine culture (EQUC) technique. This technique was able to find bacteria that are not identified by the standard culture techniques typically used to diagnose urinary tract syndromes. This study also used 16S rDNA sequencing to classify bacterial DNA. The UUI and non-UUI urinary bacteria differed by group based on both culture type and sequence.

“These findings may have strong implications for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of women with this form of incontinence,” said Paul Schreckenberger, PhD, co-investigator and director, clinical microbiology laboratory, Loyola University Health System.

Correlation found between weight loss and hot flash reduction in menopause

July 22nd, 2014

Now women have yet one more incentive to lose weight as a new study has shown evidence that behavioral weight loss can help manage menopausal hot flashes.

The pilot study, which was published online last month in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), consisted of 40 overweight or obese white and African-American women with hot flashes, which are the most prevalent symptom of menopause. In fact, more than 70% of women report hot flashes during the menopausal transition, with many of these women reporting frequent or severe hot flashes. Since women with hot flashes are at greater risk for poor quality of life, sleep problems and a depressed mood, interest in identifying methods for managing hot flashes is growing. In addition, newer data indicate that hot flashes are typically persistent, lasting an average of nine years or more.

For purposes of the pilot clinical trial, hot flashes were assessed before and after intervention via physiologic monitoring, diary and questionnaire. The study confirmed a significant correlation between weight loss and hot flashes. Furthermore, the degree of weight loss correlated with the degree of reduction in hot flashes.

Although newer data has suggested a positive relationship between hot flashes and the percentage of fat in a woman’s body, no studies, to date, had been specifically designed to test whether weight loss reduces hot flashes. The authors of this pilot study concluded that, while the results were encouraging in proving the benefits of weight reduction in the management of menopausal hot flashes, more than anything, the findings indicate the importance of conducting a larger study.

“This is encouraging news for women looking for relief for this bothersome midlife symptom,” says NAMS Executive Director Margery Gass, MD. “Not only might behavior weight loss provide a safe, effective remedy for many women, but it also encourages a health-promoting behavior. Since many of the women in this pilot study indicated their primary motivator for losing weight was hot flash reduction, we know that this could be a strong incentive for women to engage in a healthier lifestyle which provides numerous other health benefits beyond hot flash management.”

Bacterial communities may play a role in female urgency urinary incontinence

July 21st, 2014

Bacteria found in the bladders of healthy women differ from bacteria in women with a common form of incontinence, according to researchers from Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

These findings, published in the American Society for Microbiology’s online journal mBio, suggest that bacterial communities may play a role in female urinary health.

“Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) is a common, yet poorly understood, condition with symptoms similar to urinary tract infections,” said Alan Wolfe, PhD, co-investigator and professor of Microbiology and Immunology. “If we can determine that certain bacteria cause UUI symptoms, we may be able to better identify those at risk for this condition and more effectively treat them.”

Approximately 15 percent of women suffer from UUI and yet an estimated 40 – 50 percent do not respond to conventional treatments. One possible explanation for the lack of response to medication may be the bacteria present in these women.

This study evaluated urine specimens of 90 women with and without UUI symptoms. Samples were collected through a catheter and analyzed using an expanded quantitative urine culture (EQUC) technique. This technique was able to find bacteria that are not identified by the standard culture techniques typically used to diagnose urinary tract syndromes. This study also used 16S rDNA sequencing to classify bacterial DNA. The UUI and non-UUI urinary bacteria differed by group based on both culture type and sequence.

“These findings may have strong implications for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of women with this form of incontinence,” said Paul Schreckenberger, PhD, co-investigator and director, clinical microbiology laboratory, Loyola University Health System.

Weight loss may ease menopause symptoms

July 21st, 2014

Weight loss may ease menopause symptoms

BMJ Group News


What do we know already?

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Around 80 in 100 women get hot flushes, night sweats, or other symptoms during the menopause. Although most women do not need treatment, around half find the symptoms distressing. Hot flushes can be uncomfortable and cause sleepless nights. Many women say that making changes to their lifestyle and diet – taking regular exercise and avoiding certain foods, for example – helps ease their symptoms.

Studies suggest being overweight increases the likelihood of hot flushes and night sweats, but we don’t know whether weight loss might help them.

Researchers looked at 17,473 women in the US who had been going through the menopause and who had been randomly put into two groups. One half made changes to their diet aimed at reducing their fat intake and increasing fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in their diet. The other half were a control group who made no specific changes to their diet. This allowed the researchers to see what impact, if any, the diet would have on their symptoms.

Slideshow: All about menopause and perimenopause

What does the new study say?

Overall, the women on the low fat diet who had symptoms of the menopause and who lost weight – either 4.5 kilograms (10 pounds) or more, or at least 10 percent of their body weight – found their symptoms improved.

After one year, women who lost weight had significantly fewer hot flushes and night sweats compared to the other women in the study. And some found their flushes and sweats disappeared entirely.

Women who lost weight during the study – whether they were on the diet or not – had fewer hot flushes or night sweats (or none at all) than those who did not lose any weight. And women on the diet were three times as likely to lose weight (2 kilograms or 4 pounds or more) as those not on it.

However, there was a surprise finding. Women on the diet who gained more than 4.5 kilograms (10 pounds) in weight also saw their hot flushes and night sweats improve. The researchers say this suggests that the benefits of healthy eating may not be down to weight loss alone.

How reliable is the research?

This type of study cannot prove if a particular diet or a certain amount of weight loss will help menopausal symptoms.

The researchers did take into account many factors that could have affected the results. For example, they considered whether the women smoked or drank alcohol, which can make hot flushes worse. They also made sure none of the women were on hormone replacement therapy (HRT) because this can improve these symptoms.

The study relies on women accurately remembering their symptoms and assumes that they followed the diet as recommended.

Also, it is not clear how many of the women in the study were overweight, which could be important given past studies have found a link between being overweight and hot flushes.

What does this mean for me?

The study found hot flushes and night sweats improved for women who were on a low fat diet and lost weight. Although this is not solid evidence that changing your diet and losing weight helps menopause symptoms, it is advisable to eat a well-balanced diet and maintain a healthy weight anyway.

There are things you can try to improve your symptoms, such as avoiding things that trigger your hot flushes, like spicy food, alcohol, hot drinks, and caffeine. Sleeping in a cool room, with cotton bed linens and a fan, may also help with night sweats.

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Originally posted 2012-07-13 20:44:46. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Source: http://www.webmd.boots.com/menopause/news/20120713/weight-loss-may-ease-menopause-symptoms?src=RSS_PUBLIC

Correlation found between weight loss and hot flash reduction in menopause

July 21st, 2014

Now women have yet one more incentive to lose weight as a new study has shown evidence that behavioral weight loss can help manage menopausal hot flashes.

The pilot study, which was published online last month in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), consisted of 40 overweight or obese white and African-American women with hot flashes, which are the most prevalent symptom of menopause. In fact, more than 70% of women report hot flashes during the menopausal transition, with many of these women reporting frequent or severe hot flashes. Since women with hot flashes are at greater risk for poor quality of life, sleep problems and a depressed mood, interest in identifying methods for managing hot flashes is growing. In addition, newer data indicate that hot flashes are typically persistent, lasting an average of nine years or more.

For purposes of the pilot clinical trial, hot flashes were assessed before and after intervention via physiologic monitoring, diary and questionnaire. The study confirmed a significant correlation between weight loss and hot flashes. Furthermore, the degree of weight loss correlated with the degree of reduction in hot flashes.

Although newer data has suggested a positive relationship between hot flashes and the percentage of fat in a woman’s body, no studies, to date, had been specifically designed to test whether weight loss reduces hot flashes. The authors of this pilot study concluded that, while the results were encouraging in proving the benefits of weight reduction in the management of menopausal hot flashes, more than anything, the findings indicate the importance of conducting a larger study.

“This is encouraging news for women looking for relief for this bothersome midlife symptom,” says NAMS Executive Director Margery Gass, MD. “Not only might behavior weight loss provide a safe, effective remedy for many women, but it also encourages a health-promoting behavior. Since many of the women in this pilot study indicated their primary motivator for losing weight was hot flash reduction, we know that this could be a strong incentive for women to engage in a healthier lifestyle which provides numerous other health benefits beyond hot flash management.”

Bacterial communities may play a role in female urgency urinary incontinence

July 19th, 2014

Bacteria found in the bladders of healthy women differ from bacteria in women with a common form of incontinence, according to researchers from Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

These findings, published in the American Society for Microbiology’s online journal mBio, suggest that bacterial communities may play a role in female urinary health.

“Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) is a common, yet poorly understood, condition with symptoms similar to urinary tract infections,” said Alan Wolfe, PhD, co-investigator and professor of Microbiology and Immunology. “If we can determine that certain bacteria cause UUI symptoms, we may be able to better identify those at risk for this condition and more effectively treat them.”

Approximately 15 percent of women suffer from UUI and yet an estimated 40 – 50 percent do not respond to conventional treatments. One possible explanation for the lack of response to medication may be the bacteria present in these women.

This study evaluated urine specimens of 90 women with and without UUI symptoms. Samples were collected through a catheter and analyzed using an expanded quantitative urine culture (EQUC) technique. This technique was able to find bacteria that are not identified by the standard culture techniques typically used to diagnose urinary tract syndromes. This study also used 16S rDNA sequencing to classify bacterial DNA. The UUI and non-UUI urinary bacteria differed by group based on both culture type and sequence.

“These findings may have strong implications for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of women with this form of incontinence,” said Paul Schreckenberger, PhD, co-investigator and director, clinical microbiology laboratory, Loyola University Health System.

Correlation found between weight loss and hot flash reduction in menopause

July 19th, 2014

Now women have yet one more incentive to lose weight as a new study has shown evidence that behavioral weight loss can help manage menopausal hot flashes.

The pilot study, which was published online last month in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), consisted of 40 overweight or obese white and African-American women with hot flashes, which are the most prevalent symptom of menopause. In fact, more than 70% of women report hot flashes during the menopausal transition, with many of these women reporting frequent or severe hot flashes. Since women with hot flashes are at greater risk for poor quality of life, sleep problems and a depressed mood, interest in identifying methods for managing hot flashes is growing. In addition, newer data indicate that hot flashes are typically persistent, lasting an average of nine years or more.

For purposes of the pilot clinical trial, hot flashes were assessed before and after intervention via physiologic monitoring, diary and questionnaire. The study confirmed a significant correlation between weight loss and hot flashes. Furthermore, the degree of weight loss correlated with the degree of reduction in hot flashes.

Although newer data has suggested a positive relationship between hot flashes and the percentage of fat in a woman’s body, no studies, to date, had been specifically designed to test whether weight loss reduces hot flashes. The authors of this pilot study concluded that, while the results were encouraging in proving the benefits of weight reduction in the management of menopausal hot flashes, more than anything, the findings indicate the importance of conducting a larger study.

“This is encouraging news for women looking for relief for this bothersome midlife symptom,” says NAMS Executive Director Margery Gass, MD. “Not only might behavior weight loss provide a safe, effective remedy for many women, but it also encourages a health-promoting behavior. Since many of the women in this pilot study indicated their primary motivator for losing weight was hot flash reduction, we know that this could be a strong incentive for women to engage in a healthier lifestyle which provides numerous other health benefits beyond hot flash management.”

Correlation found between weight loss and hot flash reduction in menopause

July 18th, 2014

Now women have yet one more incentive to lose weight as a new study has shown evidence that behavioral weight loss can help manage menopausal hot flashes.

The pilot study, which was published online last month in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS), consisted of 40 overweight or obese white and African-American women with hot flashes, which are the most prevalent symptom of menopause. In fact, more than 70% of women report hot flashes during the menopausal transition, with many of these women reporting frequent or severe hot flashes. Since women with hot flashes are at greater risk for poor quality of life, sleep problems and a depressed mood, interest in identifying methods for managing hot flashes is growing. In addition, newer data indicate that hot flashes are typically persistent, lasting an average of nine years or more.

For purposes of the pilot clinical trial, hot flashes were assessed before and after intervention via physiologic monitoring, diary and questionnaire. The study confirmed a significant correlation between weight loss and hot flashes. Furthermore, the degree of weight loss correlated with the degree of reduction in hot flashes.

Although newer data has suggested a positive relationship between hot flashes and the percentage of fat in a woman’s body, no studies, to date, had been specifically designed to test whether weight loss reduces hot flashes. The authors of this pilot study concluded that, while the results were encouraging in proving the benefits of weight reduction in the management of menopausal hot flashes, more than anything, the findings indicate the importance of conducting a larger study.

“This is encouraging news for women looking for relief for this bothersome midlife symptom,” says NAMS Executive Director Margery Gass, MD. “Not only might behavior weight loss provide a safe, effective remedy for many women, but it also encourages a health-promoting behavior. Since many of the women in this pilot study indicated their primary motivator for losing weight was hot flash reduction, we know that this could be a strong incentive for women to engage in a healthier lifestyle which provides numerous other health benefits beyond hot flash management.”

Bacterial communities may play a role in female urgency urinary incontinence

July 17th, 2014

Bacteria found in the bladders of healthy women differ from bacteria in women with a common form of incontinence, according to researchers from Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

These findings, published in the American Society for Microbiology’s online journal mBio, suggest that bacterial communities may play a role in female urinary health.

“Urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) is a common, yet poorly understood, condition with symptoms similar to urinary tract infections,” said Alan Wolfe, PhD, co-investigator and professor of Microbiology and Immunology. “If we can determine that certain bacteria cause UUI symptoms, we may be able to better identify those at risk for this condition and more effectively treat them.”

Approximately 15 percent of women suffer from UUI and yet an estimated 40 – 50 percent do not respond to conventional treatments. One possible explanation for the lack of response to medication may be the bacteria present in these women.

This study evaluated urine specimens of 90 women with and without UUI symptoms. Samples were collected through a catheter and analyzed using an expanded quantitative urine culture (EQUC) technique. This technique was able to find bacteria that are not identified by the standard culture techniques typically used to diagnose urinary tract syndromes. This study also used 16S rDNA sequencing to classify bacterial DNA. The UUI and non-UUI urinary bacteria differed by group based on both culture type and sequence.

“These findings may have strong implications for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of women with this form of incontinence,” said Paul Schreckenberger, PhD, co-investigator and director, clinical microbiology laboratory, Loyola University Health System.